World Elephant Day 2020

Celebrating World Elephant Day

August 12 is World Elephant Day and we are celebrating with all things “ele,” from brand new video content straight from our team in the Serengeti, to links and resources that support elephant conservation, to our favorite itineraries for outstanding elephant viewing (and even some ethical interactions).

In June 2020, while the Central Serengeti was shut down to international tourism, our team of The Wild Source guides and biologists in Tanzania ventured out to continue their research of big cats of the Serengeti. 

But, as tends to happen when charismatic elephants are part of the equation, our guides became captivated on one game drive by the fascinating, social behavior of a breeding herd ranging in age from tiny young calves to adolescents to the matriarch.  Watch below to feel like you are part of the herd on their “spa day.”

New from Disneynature: "Elephant"

Celebrate World Elephant Day with a home-viewing of Disneynature’s new featurette documentary, following the visually stunning story of a herd of elephant migrating over hundreds of miles.

Narrated by Meghan, The Duchess of Sussex, Disneynature’s “Elephant” follows African elephant Shani and her spirited son Jomo as their herd makes an epic journey hundreds of miles across the vast Kalahari Desert, from the Okavango Delta to the Zambezi River, just as countless generations of their ancestors have done before.

Live from the Ol Donyo Waterhole

Ol Donyo Lodge, wedged between Kenya’s Tsavo and Amboseli National Parks in the heart of the Chyulu Hills, has a webcam of their waterhole. Keep an eye on the link below for possible live elephant action!

Ol Donyo Lodge Live Waterhole Cam

Inspired to Learn More?

Elephants today are threatened by habitat loss, poaching, human-elephant conflict and more. World Elephant Day is an annual, international event to bring awareness to conservation and protection of both African and Asian elephants.  Visit WorldElephantDay.org to learn more about how you can get involved.

Organizations such as ElephantsWithoutBorders.org, SheldrickWildlifeTrust.org and MaraElephantProject.org also provide resources to learn more about elephant conservation across African countries where elephants are protected in national parks, reserves, private wildlife concessions and sanctuaries. 

Our Favorite Itineraries for Outstanding Elephant Viewing

Botswana Elephant Safari

Elephant relaxing in a water hole in the Okavango Delta

This elephant-focused safari takes you to one of the best locations in all of Africa for seeing and interacting with elephants: Northern Botswana. Botswana is world-renowned for its incredible numbers of elephants, estimated to be upwards of 130,000. 

Highlights include an (ethical) elephant encounter at The Elephant Camp in Victoria Falls, boat safaris on the Chobe River where it is possible to see herds in the hundreds coming to the river to drink, bathe and even swim across it, game viewing in the world-class wilderness of the Okavango Delta, and an incredible chance to walk and interact with elephants at Stanley’s Camp.

Kenya Luxury for Less

This Kenya luxury itinerary includes a finale at the lovely Ol Donyo Lodge, with opportunities to see some of Africa’s biggest elephants, participate in a diversity of activities and sleep out under the stars – in style. Plus, you’ll visit the iconic Masai Mara Reserve where beautiful breeding herds of elephants are bountiful. For true elephant enthusiasts, an extra night in Nairobi gives you time to visit The Sheldrick Wildlife Trust while the keepers feed orphaned elephant calves that have been rescued for rehabilitation at the nursery and eventual reintroduction into the wild.

Zambia Walking and Waterways

This itinerary combines the birthplace of walking safaris, the South Luangwa, with the water paradise of the Lower Zambezi.  A safari in these areas offers the incredible and unique opportunity to (safely) approach and view these gentle giants by both foot and boat or canoe.   In the Lower Zambezi, the elephants are particularly spectacular as they come to drink, bathe and swim (with their trunk snorkels held high!) as you glide down the river in your canoe. 

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