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Africa Safari Blog






Tanzania Safari Days 8,9, and 10: Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Wednesday, 20 May 2009 08:11 by webmaster

Bill is now in Serengeti National Park in Tanzania for the fifth stop of his 2009 Tanzania Safari. Click below to see the other stops on the 2009 Tanzania Safari.

Bill is now in the legendary Serengeti National Park. Serengeti National Park boasts over 90,000 visitors each year and contains all of the Big Five - Lions, Leopards, Elephants, Cape Buffalo and Rhinos.

The Great Migration is what the park is most known for. Nearly two million wildebeest and zebras follow an approximately clockwise path of migration following the historical rains - and therefore the best feeding areas each year. This migration is largely in and around Serengeti National Park. A map of the migration is shown to the right along with information about where you can find the vast zebra and wildebeest herds during the year. The pins on the map are interactive, so click on them to get the seasonal information, and you may also zoom in and zoom out to get more details.


View The Great Migration in a larger map

For more information about Serengeti National Park, - see the official Serengeti National Park Official Website


Tanzania Safari Key
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Above, you can see Bill's progress for the 2009 Tanzania Safari. He is currently in Serengeti National Park for today, tomorrow, and the next day. West Kilimanjaro is next. Please note that the map is interactive - you can click on markers to get details about Bill's safari trip - and you can also zoom in and zoom out on the map.

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Tanzania Safari Days 6 and 7: Gombe Stream National Park, Tanzania

Monday, 18 May 2009 09:07 by webmaster

Even More Chimps at Gombe Stream National Park

Bill is now in Gombe Stream National Park in Tanzania for the fourth stop of his 2009 Tanzania Safari. Click below to see the other stops on the 2009 Tanzania Safari.

Bill is now in the middle of his safari and will be staying for two days in Gombe Stream National Park - which is known mostly for some great chimpanzee trekking. The park is actually where Jane Goodall conducted her groundbreaking chimpanzee research. Gombe Stream is the smallest of Tanzania's National Parks - only about 20 square miles in size. Wildlife viewing - at least mammals - mostly consists of abundant populations of primates.

This should be a really special segment of the trip for Bill - to be at Gombe Stream - where Jane Goodall conducted her research. For more information about Gombe Stream, - see the official Gombe Stream National Park Website


Tanzania Safari Key


Above, you can see Bill's progress for the 2009 Tanzania Safari. He is currently in Gombe Stream National Park for today and tomorrow. The next stop after Gombe Stream National Park will be Serengeti National Park. Please note that the map is interactive - you can click on markers to get details about Bill's safari trip - and you can also zoom in and zoom out on the map.

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Tarangire National Park Lion Study

Sunday, 17 May 2009 10:33 by webmaster

One area of TheWildSource.com's website that is probably underutilized from a visitor perspective is all of the great Africa Safari News that we offer from camps in Africa and from bloggers and scientists from around the globe. We scour the Internet (daily when we can) and put together some of the more interesting stories from the wild places of Africa.

One of the more interesting - and timely - blog posts I was able to find today deals with a lion study in Tarangire National Park in Tanzania. Tarangire National Park happens to be the last stop on Bill's 2009 Tanzania Safari (which he is currently on). This study comprises approximately 3/4 of Tarangire National Park and there are between 180 and 200 lions within the study area. Over the past 5 years, the lion population is showing a declining trend. The blog post describes radio collaring and tracking the lions - how they collect their data. It gives good insight as to how the scientists conduct their research.

For more information:
Lion Prides of Tarangire Post
Official Website for Tarangire National Park
TheWildSource.com Safari News Section

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Tanzania Safari Days 4 and 5: Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania

Saturday, 16 May 2009 09:45 by webmaster

BRING ON THE CHIMPS!!

Bill is now in Mahale National Park in Tanzania for the third stop of his 2009 Tanzania Safari. Click below to see the other stops on the 2009 Tanzania Safari.

Mahale National Park (Mahale Mountains National Park)

For today and tomorrow, Bill will be staying at the Kungwe Beach Lodge in Mahale National Park, Tanzania. From his last time in Mahale National Park in February, 2008, we have an amazing, detailed account of his Chimpanzee Encounters. From this accounting of his last trip, you'll learn a lot about Mahale National Park and the wild chimpanzees who reside there, including:

  • Bill's Most Amazing Close-up Wildlife Encounter Ever
  • Chimpanzee Politics - Lots of Political Manuevering Within the Group
  • Rules For Chimp Viewing (small groups, masks)
  • How Close Do You Get to the Chimpanzees? (Hint: many don't seem to have a comfort zone)
  • How to Best Prepare for The Jungle Environment (for photos, and eyeglass wearers)
  • Other Primates You Can Expect to See in Mahale

I'm really looking forward to hearing his stories from this portion of the safari trip. For more information about Mahale - see the official Mahale Mountains National Park Website


Tanzania Safari Key


Above, you can see Bill's progress for the 2009 Tanzania Safari. He is currently in Mahale Mountains National Park for today and tomorrow. After that, he'll be moving on to Gombe Stream National Park on Monday. The map is completely interactive - click on the pins to learn more about the locations and accommodations.

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Evaluating Safari Deals Part 5: Combining Separate Safari Deals

Friday, 15 May 2009 08:43 by webmaster

To help provide insight into this new safari deals section of the website, I have decided to put together a six part blog post about how to best evaluate a safari deal:

Note - this is part of the ongoing series of blog posts put together by wildlife biologist Bill Given. I have posted this blog post while he is away on Safari in Tanzania.

This is part five of that six part blog post: Combining Separate Safari Deals

Combining Separate Safari Deals

Photo of Duba Plains Lions
Like a coalition of male lions, synergy can be achieved by combining different individual deals.
Skimmer boy male lions at Duba Plains, photo by Bill Given.

It can be advantageous to combine safari deals to utilize each special offer for the best camps that an operator has on their circuit rather than use only one operator's camps. This works particularly well with deals that have set special rates per camp rather than being dependent on a certain number of night stays. For example I often combine camps from the Kalahari Summer Special with camps from the 5 Rivers Special during Botswana’s green season. By mixing and matching from these two special deals there is great flexibility of camp choice to meet the diverse needs of different clients and there is much more on offer than if limited to one deal or the other.

Recommendation Combining Safari Deals

Remember - you don't have to be locked in to one tour operator's deals for your entire safari itinerary. Look around at different safari specials to see if you can combine them. I can match your safari objectives with the best deal - or deals - possible. Contact Me.



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